Mojave Scissor Spring Snare

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Mojave Scissor Spring Snare

Postby dixieangler » Sun Jun 19, 2011 8:22 pm

I was watching the dueling duo Dual show and the barefoot guy sets out some Southwest scissor snares in Mexico. If you don't know what this thing is (the show did not really give details, surprise, surprise), it uses two sticks that act like a pair of scissors when the second cord or scissors cord closes them. The first cord is the spring cord. This thing has more steps in it, uses more materials, and cord than most standard spring snares. So why not KISS. That is Keep It Simple Stupid. The more complex a snare is, the more can go wrong with it. He got lucky and got a rabbit. I know the scissor snare has been used for centuries in the Southwest, but why he did not just use a simple spring snare and save the extra steps and extra material is beyond me. Fixed snares would have been even easier than simple spring snares and work just as good on rabbits.

There are times when a spring snare is an advantage. It can keep a meal suspended off the ground and away from most meal snatching critters but it takes more time and materials to set one up than a simple fixed snare. Depending on the animal it also can keep the animal from reaching around and biting through the snare. Some animals can bite through the snare anyway whether spring or fixed snare unless the snare is wire. The fixed snare has the advantage of ease of set up but it is on the ground usually and a snared meal may be stolen more easily by another critter. All snares should be checked regularly or routinely so a snared meal is not stolen by another critter whether that be a fixed or spring snare. To me, fixed snares are more time and energy saving and achieve the same results of trapping a meal. But I do recognize that there are times where one or two spring snares may be an advantage over the fixed snares and for me that would depend on the particular game I target and the other animals that may be around to take a snared meal. I am of course referring here to snaring small game like rabbits and squirrels. They do also work on armadillos we have here but I would only eat an armadillo as a last resort. lol

As with any trap, it has to be set up where the animals are moving so it is a good idea to look for animal sign and be able to recognize what made the sign. Then set up a snare based on the location and animal to be targeted with as little disturbance to the area as possible. Funneling works well to force an animal along an intended path and animals, like water, take the path of least resistance.
- Robert M.

"I can do all things through Christ, who strengtheneth me." - Paul, c. A.D. 60 (Philippians 4:13)
dixieangler
 
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Re: Mojave Scissor Spring Snare

Postby dixieangler » Thu Dec 01, 2011 10:13 pm

dixieangler wrote:I was watching the dueling duo Dual show and the barefoot guy sets out some Southwest scissor snares in Mexico. If you don't know what this thing is (the show did not really give details, surprise, surprise), it uses two sticks that act like a pair of scissors when the second cord or scissors cord closes them. The first cord is the spring cord. This thing has more steps in it, uses more materials, and cord than most standard spring snares. So why not KISS. That is Keep It Simple Stupid. The more complex a snare is, the more can go wrong with it. He got lucky and got a rabbit. I know the scissor snare has been used for centuries in the Southwest, but why he did not just use a simple spring snare and save the extra steps and extra material is beyond me. Fixed snares would have been even easier than simple spring snares and work just as good on rabbits.


I am not even sure that the Cody guy even caught the rabbit they showed. Might have been set up like the tied up turkey that Dave shot with a bow and arrow on another show. The toggle trigger system, the brace for the scissor part, the spring, all the cord, and all the while more disturbance to the animal run and more human scent spread around. The animal can only go in on the one side (where the scissors are) or it won't work. If the animal goes for any bait on the pressure stick on the other side without going through the scissors, it won't work. An animal can come at the trap from many different directions not just the two directions on the run. The only things it has going for it is the method of the kill (crushing suffocate) and that it is "somewhat" more selective for rabbit (depends on what other animals use the run).

I saw some kid on youtube show this thing the other day. He used a "green" stick for the spring. If he let it set for a while and it dries out, the spring will hold the shape he set it and no longer spring back. That is why a seasoned stick needs to be used. His anchor sticks did not hold when the trap was sprung and they flew out of the ground. An animal may survive the impact and escape if all parts to hold the animal do not hold. He used more parts than necessary for the toggle/pressure trigger. He was trying to stabilize the pressure stick with more sticks but if the parts were cut right, he wouldn't need to do that. To be fair, he was a young kid and the only place he probably ever set up was his back yard...and he probably knows more about traps than most kids nowadays.
- Robert M.

"I can do all things through Christ, who strengtheneth me." - Paul, c. A.D. 60 (Philippians 4:13)
dixieangler
 
Posts: 1172
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2008 9:24 pm
Location: Sebring, FL


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