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HomeSurvivalShelterDebris Hut

Debris hut made at a Standard Class
at the Tracker School

(May 2004)

  

First step is to lay out the framework. One long ridgepole provides the main frame. It can be propped against a convenient tree (as in this case), or held up with a tripod of stout sticks, or some other means.

Then the sides of the shelter are placed, creating a "tent-like" framework.

 

The main side pieces mostly in place.
  

Then a "lattice-work" of smaller branches is placed over the main framework. The purpose of this is to keep the debris out of the shelter.
 
Debris is then piled on top of the lattice-work.

At the Standard Class, bales of hay are used because there is not enough debris around to constantly build, demolish, and rebuild the shelter for each class.

At a subsequent class, participants have the opportunity to build a "real" debris hut for themselves to sleep in for the week, using actual natural materials available in the forest.

 

The entrance. This can be a tricky part. The purpose of this is to keep the debris out of the doorway.

The occupant crawls in under this arch.

  

The finished debris hut, from behind (opposite the entrance).

 

Occupied.

Note how the debris covering the shelter is kept away from the entrance by the arch that was constructed earlier.

 

A farther-away view.

Finished, and all ready for a good, warm night's sleep.

All photos on this page are Copyright by Daniel Spuhler. Used with permission.