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HomeSurvivalShelterDebris Hut

Debris Hut

by Joe Shilling (Deer Runner)

 

Joe in front of his completed shelter.
Note that this shelter incorporates the roots from a fallen tree. This serves to help support the shelter, making it stronger. As well, it reduces the amount of material needed to construct the shelter.
A view of the front.
Side view.
 
Here are three photos of the doorway, prior to debris being placed over the framework.
The construction of an entranceway can be the most difficult part of building a debris hut, in terms of deciding how to construct it.
Another view of the door framework.
A view inside the front door.
Joe standing on top of his debris shelter.
Joe in front of his creation.

Note that this is a fairly large debris shelter. It could therefore be used for longer term use. It would also fit more people than a one-person low-to-the-ground type.

More bodies inside means more body heat to provide warmth. It also means there's more space to heat.

Photos on this page Copyright by Joe Shilling 2005. Used with permission.