Wildwood Survival website

SURVIVAL
Shelter
Water
Fire
Food
Clothing
Fishing
Hunting
Traps
Snares
Tools
Stone
Flintknapping
Tracker Knife
Cordage
Containers
Furniture
Lights
Hides
Pitch & Glue
Winter
Health
Lyme Disease
Vision
Native People
Emergency Prep
Navigation
Teaching
Young People
Practicing
Music
Humour
More
Wilderness Mind
Site Disclaimer
Bookstore
Booklist
Forums
Contributors
Sitemap
Guestbook
About this site
Use of material
Email me
Privacy Policy
HomeSurvivalSnares

Bird Snares

  

For an overview of snares in general, see the Rolling Snare page.



Snare constructed by Rob Bicevskis

Here is a simple bird snare, attached to a bird feeder.

The horizontal perch stick is loosely placed into a crack on the side of this bird feeder. Note the wedge-shaped end of the stick. It should be held very loosely in the crack.

A noose is placed over the horizontal stick. Note we have used much thicker string in this case in order to illustrate the technique.

When a bird perches on the horizontal stick, its weight will push the stick down, and the bird will be snared.

 

 



Snare constructed by Rob Bicevskis

Here is a second bird snare. The general principle is the same as the above snare, except it is installed in an upright stick, and there is a weight attached to the snare loop.

Again, a horizontal perch stick is loosely placed into a hole in the vertical larger stick. The noose goes through the hole as well, helping to hold the horizontal stick.

When a bird lands on the horizontal stick, it dips down, and the weight of the rock as it drops towards the ground (no longer being held by the perch stick) quickly pulls the noose tight around the bird's legs. The bird is pulled tightly against the vertical stick and is held there.

 

  


Snare constructed by Rob Bicevskis

A close-up view of the same snare: the hole from behind. Note the string passes through the hole - the same hole that the horizontal perch stick is placed in. The other end of the snare string is tied to a stone which serves as a weight.

  

  


Snare and photo by Allan "Bow" Beauchamp

Another design of bird snare.