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HomeSurvivalSnares

Rolling Snare

 


Snare constructed by Walter Muma.

Here is an overall photo of the rolling snare. This is an animal's view of the setup, as seen walking along a trail.

White string was used to highlight the parts of the snare. Normally you would use cordage that blended into the surroundings.

Note the small sticks placed along the trail to help ensure the animal doesn't bypass the snare. The noose is supported on small sticks to elevate it the proper distance above the ground, and to ensure that it stays in a loop shape. This type of snare is unbaited.

The trigger mechanism is seen on the right side of the photo. There is a larger stick pushed in to the ground, and a smaller trigger stick that is held in place by the large one.

The string leading to the spring is the one that leads upward from the trigger stick.

  


Snare constructed by Walter Muma

Here is a close-up view of the trigger mechanism.

The string at the bottom leads to the noose. The top string leads up to the spring stick (often a small tree or branch).

Note how the nub on the small trigger stick is being held against the larger stick (which is stuck into the ground). When the noose is pulled, the small trigger stick easily slips out from where it's being held and the snare is released.

 

  


Snare constructed by Walter Muma

Another view. Here the trigger has been set to be much more sensitive. Much less pressure is required to release it.

Other ways in which it can be made more sensitive are: grease the surfaces, make them rounder, and have less of them in contact with each other (as shown here).

 

  


Snare constructed by Walter Muma.

This photo shows a small tree bent over to provide the spring for the snare. The upward pressure of the tree trying to spring back to its normal vertical position is what holds the snare trigger in place.

It also will pull the animal suddenly up into the air when released.

Bear in mind that some trees and branches, if left in their bent position for too long, will lose some of their spring, and thus be much less effective. This varies from tree to tree, branch to branch.

Instead of a tree, a branch of a larger tree could be used, or a springy stick shoved into the ground.

 

  

Click on the small photo to watch a movie of this snare in action.

This movie attempts to illustrate how the prey is jerked up and away from the ground by the snare. A toy stuffed animal is used.

Please note that in this example the spring is not strong enough to kill a small animal. It needs to be made stronger.

Snare constructed by Walter Muma

Windows Media format (WMV)
320x240, 377 KB


Snare constructed by Rob Bicevskis

Here is a variation of the Rolling Snare trigger.

A notch is cut in each stick, and they are held by the upward pressure of the spring - in this case the spring is attached to the rightmost stick.

This will be a "stickier" trigger, not as easily tripped. Although it could be made more sensitive by angling the notch, greasing the surfaces, etc.

 

  

Snare constructed by Rob Bicevskis
A view of this snare ready to go. It has been placed across a small animal trail.