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HomeSurvivalSnares

Snares  

Overview of snares

The main purpose of snares is to capture animals for the purpose of food. Of course, all parts of a captured animal should be utilized.

A snare consists of a loop (noose) of cordage placed across an animal trail or other place where an animal is likely to walk through, a trigger mechanism, and a spring stick of some sort that will quickly jerk the animal up into the air when triggered.

The noose is placed at such a level above the ground that when the target animal walks into it, only its head will go through the noose. As the rest of the animal's body follows as it continues to walk through the noose area, its shoulders or other body parts will contact the rest of the noose, pulling it forward and releasing the trigger.

When the trigger is released, a stick or tree branch that has been bent down and is under tension springs back up, pulling the animal suddenly up with it. This accomplishes two things. First, the spring should be under enough tension to snap up quickly, killing the animal instantly by breaking its neck. Secondly, it elevates the dead animal up in the air, away from other ground predators who would also enjoy the meal.

Properly built and set, a snare is an effective and humane way to kill an animal for food in a survival situation.

If you wish to practice with snares in a real-life situation, replace the noose string with thin, easily broken thread. Part of the challenge of setting snares is placing them in the right location. This way you will be able to know if the snare got triggered, but will not injure any animals needlessly.

In a real-life situation, all parts of the snare should be camouflaged and de-scented.

  

  

See also the Traps section of this website
See also the Hunting section of this website
See also the Fishing section of this website
See also the Food section of this website